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annual conference on science, policy, and the environment, disasters in the environment. i'm the executive director of a national council of the science of the environment, and it is my distinct master of ceremonies for much of the conference. thank you for coming. lots of people are still outside, encourage them to come in and settle themselves down. super storm sandy, drought on agriculture, wildfires, the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear reactor accident in japan last year, haiti earthquake, the list is long and worrying. in 20 # 11, we had more disasters in the united states costing more than a billion dollars than ever. in fact, we had more expensive disasters, but not quite as many in 2012. the drought and the super storm were hugely, hugely expensive. disasters are happening with greater frequency, greater severity, and absolutely with many, many greater costs. we ray -- we are here over the next three days to work across traditional boundaries to connect scientists of all stripes with practitioners, with policymakers from the international to the local level with co
. the area is also subject to what we in science call multiple stressors. sometimes they are multiple insult as well. again, these red light con influence -- con influence of how how many and natural processes ongoing. there are a couple of highlight national problems in louisiana including the low ox yen area shawf show. sometimes called the dead zone. the high land rates in the area. the con influence of the oil and gas industry with the social structure that also depends on the living resources of fisheries. a lot of natural dynamic, the delta plain is continually changing and wants to change all the time even if people don't want it to change. local areas subject to sea level rise. substantiative of the coast, and of course, seems like always hurricanes that impact our coastal system so dramatically. the other issue is long-term sub -- it's a some thing will change no matter what we try to do. there are going to be many issues facing us as we go in to restoration of the area with funds from the restore act and the ideas that this should be based on the knowledge that we have accrued over
to rebuild it that way. this is the last part, from the science perspective. here's my ask. who's making the decisions about where we build, how we build? and if in a summit with the united states you're going to think it's the federal government. no. some of you might think it's the state government. not really. where do these decisions get made? local officials. whether their city or county commissions, land-use planning board. this is where the decisions are made every day wear, added up, the risk exposure occurs, but on a day-to-day translational basis you probably don't see this. but this is where decisions are made about where we build, how we build, types of building codes were going to enforce. right? yet many of these officials under tremendous pressure, particularly on the downturn that generate revenue how well the generate revenue? jobs and growth. have you ever seen anybody running for office thing i want our community to get smaller? it's always jobs and growth. that's like a mantra. that's how we go tax bases. they're having to make decisions that oftentimes our short-term
conference on science, policy, and environment. my name is peter -- i'm the executive director of the national council on environment. it is my honor to be the master of ceremonies for much of this conference. thank you for coming. lot of people are still outside. i encourage them to come in and settle themselves down. so super hurricane sandy, the drought in the midwest, and the impact on agricultural, wild fires, the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear reactor in japan last year, haiti earthquake, the list is long and worrying. in 2011 we had more disasters in the united states costing over a billion dollars than ever. in fact, we had even more expensive diasters but not quite as many in 2012. the drought and the super storm were hugely, hugely expensive. so disasters are happening with greater frequency, greater severity, and absolutely will much, much greater cost. we are here over the next three days to work across traditional boundaries to connect scientists of with practitioners, policy makers from the international to the local level, with conservation -- with corporations
, the regulation that you have is going to have to be based on science. that's what the law says. what science are you going to use? and her answer was, well, we'll use mostly the united nations ipcc. lot of the people don't realize that this thing was -- i wrote a whole book about this, that this all started way back 12 years ago and it was a thing by the united nations, they formed the ipcc, intergovernmental panel on climate change and they came up with all this stuff. so she said it's going to be on the ipcc. well, poetic justice couldn't have done it better if we had planned. because it was not weeks after that, it was days after that that what happened, climategate. all of a sudden they realized through some leaked information that the ipcc had been lying all those years. i'll just mention a couple things. the u. u.k. telegraph said it's the worst scientific scandal of our generation, clive cooke of the financial times says the stink of corruption is overpowering. other ipcc prominent physicist resigns because -- quote -- "climategate was a fraud on a scale i've never seen." further, thi
and deficit reduction. he spoke at the briefing today hosted by the christian science monitor for an hour. >> thanks for coming. i'm dave cook from the monitor. welcome to the first breakfast of the new year. the guest is representative sander levin of michigan cranking member of the house ways and means committee. this is the first visit of the group. he did for deily to detroit native and the university of chicago, master's and international relations of columbia and a law degree from harvard who was elected in the michigan state senate in 1964 and served as a senate minority leader during the carter administration he was assistant administrator of the agency for international development elected to the house in 1982. for four years after his brother carl was elected to the senate. in march, 2010, representative levin one the gavel of the chairman of the ways and means committee. in the biographical portion of the program now on to the thrilling portion. as always we are on the record please, no blogging and tweeting while the breakfast is underway. there is no embargo when the breakfas
, you'll get penicillin, penicillin is the key for everyone. science is on bioengineered drugs, et cetera, where, in fact, in the future we will each get a unique drug that is bioengineered for us. how on earth does that old regulatory system move to accommodate the new one? this is extremely difficult and, of course, they are bound by the systems, right, they are bound by their history, as we all are, and this is becoming extreme difficult. in area after area, and, of course, this is, particularly the cutting edge innovative businesses that constantly get frustrated. we can grow, we can get so much bigger, we can bring in so much more money, we could create 74 jobs. and yet, there's a regulatory apparatus is simply not done to deal with the rate of technological change of the 21st century. so i think that would be the second way we could improve performance. the third way would be to take performance seriously. as i say, we have, the government is now up to its ears in performance methods. when i was having to be an advocate for the 20 years ago there was a brand-new idea. i said
and also to get a sense for whether interventions have worked. the national academy of science firearms looked at the data and a set of long as you use it with the appropriate care, acknowledge its limits, and on deily use the data that has been generated from the jurisdictions that are comprehensively tracing all of the firearms so you have a reasonable sample of gone stark recovered from the streets in the crime that you can use that data to do some generalizations. as both jon and daniel have discussed new guns are disproportionately recovered in crime. this is an important indicator that you have a flow of guns going from the legal commerce into the hands of criminals and many of these guns when you look at who the first purchaser wasn't revealed that possessor was coming you have a change of hand suggesting that not only is it moving quickly from the dealer onto the streets and it's the recovery of law enforcement and crime but also changing hands very rapidly as well. beyond the sales volume as he was suggesting some licensed dealers are disproportionately frequent sources of fire
that klaus made, the national academy of sciences shortly will be issuing a report on the nation's energy work force, and the seven or eight sectors across energy are experiencing much higher levels of retirement, much greater shortages in exactly the same skill sets that we found in the entry-level jobs and early jobs in manufacturing. so that competition across sectors for a minimal pool is only going to increase, putting more of a burden on your efforts in the region. but i think it's important to see how this is a growing problem. >> right. >> i was just going to say two quick this things. one is this big data idea that the mayor mentioned and you mentioned, and i think that's where we should just leverage that. that's the capability we have to talk about where these job needs are. we talked about the machinists, right? that is an aging talent, really vital talent pool. so i think getting more transparency because students just -- we aren't aware of what these opportunities are, and we can get that quickly. i really think that's a key element. the second related to that, you mentioned
. studying in science and technology to the second question from the audience, does the debt ceiling still have a practical purpose? could be eliminated without much consequence of? >> does what? >> the debt ceiling. >> no, it doesn't really have -- it's got symbolic value i guess, but no other country i believe, maybe one or two of the countries but i think essentially no other countries in the world have this particular institution. just so everybody understands what it is, the congress appropriates $100, tells the government to spend $100 on whatever, and then it raises $80 in revenue through its tax code. now, there is arithmetic here. so says you've got to borrow $20, right? no. the congress has to give a third row which has 100 minus 80 equals 20. there really is, if the congress is approving spending and its approving taxing, and those two things are not equal, then this kind of logically, there's got to be something to make up the difference and that difference is borrowing. i'm not saying that deficits and debt are a good thing or a blessing that at all but the way to address it i
? and that's what, as i understand the social science research, it's never been definitively established. b um, we have particularly in the south a general sense that people are responsible for their own self-protection and that they need weaponry to do it, and there is also a higher murder rate, high or violence rate in the south. it's very hard to distinguish what causes what in that situation. >> can i -- we're trying to, we can't isolate. i would argue that, well, i mean, that's the first time i've heard this research that somehow violent crime goes down when a violent video -- i've never heard that or seen that taken, but that said, to try to isolate this, i think, is slightly wrong. let me say one thing, and that is pre-'94 crime bill you had a 30-year run of crime going up and violence going up. james q. wilson, the sociologist, would say we're just going to have to get used to this fact. that policy passed in '94 which began the decline both in crime as well as violence. had a comprehensive approach about more police on the street doing community policing, getting guns off the stree
for the command and control. this is the art of military science now so we start to pull at that thread. second, third, fourth quarter of an important to all the fuss. so i think it's important to the nation to consider ramifications of looking to someone else to make those. >> thank you. >> i would like to address one piece in the remarks that you refer to as an independent silo and i can see how it might appear that way. we are different services structured differently. reservists cultures are different. but believe you me, my peers on the panel work well and cooperatively together we leverage each other's experience and the judges train together. we take the best practices in our services and try to figure out how best to apply them within the challenges that we face differently so it may not appear that we are acting in a coordinated way but i can assure you that we are particularly when it comes to the challenges of the complex litigation and the prevention and response efforts. there are also in the essential very much the same with their emphasis on prevention. once they get to us, we'll
, it is not an exact science, but the exact anonymity. it is a fair fight. >> at the meeting that we had in cairo yen one of the leaders of the syrian opposition spoke with immense and compelling pride about syria's tradition as a country the was open to varying faiths. i saw that first and myself from an earlier trip. went to the jewish temple in damascus. and he described his country as a garden of flowers with different representations from different religions and all valued together. so against that contract they are suspicious of, unhappy with the edgy hottest sentiment behind other groups. at the same time when you are fighting for your life, when your family members are being massacred and tortured, when your children are being torn apart and bomb explosions, the people who are fighting beside you require legitimacy. and it is important that we be involved enough to not only offset but overwhelmed that legitimacy that the extremist groups are obtaining. if we think back to our own history, 225 years ago we were country with an internal war for independence to drive
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

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